Why Wear Colorful Socks on World Down Syndrome Day?

Under a microscope, chromosomes resemble colorful socks.

World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD) is a celebration marked each year on March 21. The 21st day of March (the 3rd month of the year) was selected to signify the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome which causes Down Syndrome. It has been officially observed by the United Nations since 2012. Chromosomes are what make people unique. Most people have two copies of each chromosome and did you know people with Down Syndrome have three copies of the chromosome #21? That is why World Down Syndrome Day is celebrated on March 21st every year.

“As a proud mama of a child with Down Syndrome…it is a very special Day!” -Lynne Striker

Down Syndrome (or Trisomy 21) is a naturally occurring chromosomal arrangement that has always been a part of the human condition, being universally present across racial, gender or socioeconomic lines in approximately 1 in 800 live births, although there is considerable variation worldwide. Down Syndrome usually causes varying degrees of intellectual and physical disability and associated medical issues.

World Down Syndrome Day is a day to celebrate, get involved, bring awareness, and educate. Here is a global way of celebrating and bringing awareness.

#RockYourSocks campaign – pick a pair of socks that will get noticed. It could be a pair of socks that are mismatched or your craziest and most colorful socks. Pick something that will start a conversation. Why socks? Because under a microscope a pair of chromosomes look like a pair of socks.

Maybe you want to celebrate by donating to a local non profit organization…The Down Syndrome of Minnesota or find your local Down Syndrome Association and make a difference. These amazing organization’s mission are to empower individuals and families, to create community, and to celebrate the abilities of people thriving with Down syndrome. Committed to finding and providing families with accurate, helpful and balanced information and support. With a true vision that all people with Down syndrome are given the opportunity to achieve their fullest potential in an accepting and inclusive society.

Being a mom with a child living with Down Syndrome has been the best thing that has ever happened to me. My son Dylan has taught me more about life and how to live life than anyone ever has. He has faced his challenges every day with pure joy and determination. He has gone from not being able to speak at age five to having full blown conversations at age 11. He is the true meaning of Joy. Dylan touches people’s lives in an incredibly special way. I am so proud to call him my son! Please join me in bringing awareness about Down Syndrome and go find those crazy mix matched socks and celebrate!

*Cover photo from Noah’s Dad.